POLITICAL IDENTITY AMONG SOUTH AFRICAN BLACKS IN AND NEAR A CONTEMPORARY HOMELAND

Authors:
David J.A. Edwards
Published Online:
27 Sep 2007
DOI:
10.1080/00207598708246766
Pages:
39–55
Volume/Issue No:
Volume 22 Issue 1

Additional Options

In a study of political and cultural identity among Black South Africans, subjects from three localities indicated the degree of importance to them of twelve identities which included African, South African, Black, Ciskeian, Xhosa, urban/rural. Analysis of variance and factor analysis were employed. Patterns of identity in each locality were interpreted in terms of local factors determining cultural and political aspirations. In Grahamstown Ciskeian identity was seen as incompatible with South African, and was firmly rejected. In Zwelitsha attitudes to Ciskeian identity were markedly polarised, but Ciskeian identity was not seen as an alternative to South African identity. In rural Ciskei, Ciskeian identity was highly valued and South African identity was regarded as less important. Certain cultural identities were apolitical in Grahamstown and Rural Ciskei and were highly valued. In Zwelitsha where they had become politicised they were valued markedly less.

Dans une étude sur l'identité politique et culturelle parmi les Sud‐Africains noirs, des sujets de trois localités ont indiqué le degré d'importance à leurs yeux de 12 identités incluant Africain, Sud‐Africain, Noir, Ciskéien, Xhosa, Citadin/villageois. L'on a utilisé une analyse de variance et une analyse factorielle. Des modèles d'identité dans chaque localité ont été interprétés en terme de facteurs locaux déterminant les aspirations culturelles et politiques. A Grahamstown, l'identité Ciskéienne était perçue comme incompatible avec Sud‐Africain et était rejetée fermement. Dans le Zwelitsha, les attitudes à l'égard de l'identité Ciskéienne étaient fortement polarisées, mais l'identité Ciskéienne n'était pas considérée comme une alternative à l'identité Sud‐Africaine. Dans les régions rurales de Ciskei, l'identité Ciskéienne était côtée de manière élevée et l'identité Sud‐Africaine était regardée comme moins importante. Certaines identités culturelles étaient apolitiques à Grahamstown et Ciskei, et étaient hautement appréciées. Dans le Zwelitsha, où elles étaient devenues politiques, elles étaient nettement moins appréciées.

© 1987 International Union of Psychological Science