Cultural Differences in the Relation between Self‐discrepancy and Life Satisfaction

Authors:
Phanikiran Radhakrishnan, Darius K.‐S. Chan
Published Online:
21 Sep 2010
DOI:
10.1080/002075997400638
Pages:
387–398
Volume/Issue No:
Volume 32 Issue 6

Additional Options

Cultural differences in the relation between self‐discrepancy and subjective well‐being were examined. Participants from India (N = 54) and the United States (N = 55) listed 10 goals they set for themselves and their parents set for them. They rated the importance of own and parental goals from their own and their parents' perspective. They also completed measures of collectivism and well‐being. Americans, who were less collectivistic than Indians, rated their own goals to be more important than their parents' goals for them, whereas Indians regarded their own and their parents' goals as equally important. Americans' well‐being was predicted by discrepancies between own and parental ratings on personal goals. However, discrepancies between own and parental ratings on parental goals were predictive of Indians' well‐being. Theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.

Cette étude examine les différences culturelles entre l'incompatiblité du soi et le bien‐ětre subjectif. Des participants de l'Inde (N = 54) et des États‐Unis (N = 55) énumèrent 10 objectifs qu'ils se sont fixés eux‐měmes et que leurs parents leur ont fixés. Ils évaluent l'importance de leurs propres objectifs et ceux fixés par leurs parents en fonction de leur propre point de vue et de celui de leurs parents. Ils remplissent aussi des questionnaires sur le collectivisme et sur le bien‐ětre. Les participants des États‐Unis, qui se sont avérés moins collectivistes que les participants indiens, évaluent leurs propres objectifs comme plus importants que ceux fixés pour eux par leurs parents tandis que les participants indiens considèrent leurs propres objectifs et ceux fixés par leurs parents comme également importants. Le bien‐ětre des participants des États‐Unis est prédit par les incompatibilités entre les évaluations de leurs propres objectifs et les évaluations des objectifs fixés par les parents. Cependant, chez les participants indiens, le bien‐ětre est prédit par les incompatibilités entre leurs propres évaluations et les évaluations parentales des objectifs fixés par les parents.

© 1997 International Union of Psychological Science